Laying the foundations for speech - This is the second of two posts focusing on language development in babies and toddlers. Here we provide an overview of how you can actively encourage language development in babies and toddlers.  From baby sounds to structure and meaning, we have some top tips here for parents and nannies.

Most of us would agree that people should have the freedom to make choices about their own lives – from the everyday, immediate ‘what to eat/wear/do?’ to decisions relating to money, career, relationships etc. And we should get to chose, shouldn’t we. After all, each of us is a unique individual with our own likes and dislikes. With a preferred way of doing things. With our own opinions and views and priorities.

Laying the foundations for speech - This is the first of two posts focusing on language development in babies and toddlers. This article briefly outlines the main precursors to speech. To find out more about how you can support you toddler as speech emerges please see my Top Tips for Talking.

Climbing, climbing climbing. What toddler doesn’t love climbing? And what parent or carer doesn’t grow even just a few grey hairs during this mountaineering stage?! As stressful as it is though, this obsession with getting on and off, in and out, under, over and through is so important. By taking a risk and ‘having a go’ at manoeuvring their bodies within their environment children can test out what works – and what doesn’t! - through trial and error.

Have you ever asked your children / charges / students what they really want to do?  What are they interested in?  And how can you nurture that in them?  This is a must watch for every parent, teacher and student.

Top Tips on supporting children who are grieving - This is the second of two posts focusing on children's experiences of grief.  Here Carol Lee provides an overview of how you can support a child who is grieving. From ensuring an honest approach to providing opportunities for tactile play, we have some top tips here for parents and nannies.

Talking to children about death is never easy. Often, we don't think about doing it until a close relative dies. Some families try to protect children by 'softening' the reality of death, an approach which experts agree can do more harm than good. Here, Carol Lee draws on her own experiences following the death of her children's father, Andy.

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